Security Best Practices

In light of the recent security breach of the LinkedIn website and passwords, NMGI would like remind clients to take every measure possible to ensure the safety of your information.

In case you are not sure where to start, we have listed some  best practices to insure account security and privacy:

Changing Your Password:

  • Never change your password by following a link in an email that you did not request, since those links might be compromised and redirect you to the wrong place.
  • If you don’t remember your password, you can often get password help by clicking on the Forgot password link on the Sign in page of most websites.
  • In order for passwords to be effective, you should aim to update your online account passwords every few months or at least once a quarter.

Creating a Strong Password:

  • Use encrypted password management software to keep track of all of your passwords.
  • Variety – Don’t use the same password on all the sites you visit.
  • Don’t use a word from the dictionary.
  • Length – Select strong passwords that can’t easily be guessed with 10 or more characters.
  • Think of a meaningful phrase, song or quote and turn it into a complex password using the first letter of each word.
  • Complexity – Randomly add capital letters, punctuation or symbols.
  • Substitute numbers for letters that look similar (for example, substitute “0″ for “o” or “3″ for “E”.
  • Never give your password to others or write it down.

A few other account security and privacy best practices to keep in mind are:

  • Sign out of your account after you use a publicly shared computer.
  • Keep your antivirus software up to date.
  • Don’t put your email address, address or phone number on public profiles.
  • Only connect to people you know and trust.
  • Report any privacy issues to Customer Service.

*Modified from LinkedIn.com

Share

Cloud security: Risks vs. reality

used with permission from IBM ForwardView

The mobility of smart phones, netbooks, tablet PCs and other portable devices has fundamentally changed the when, where and how of our computing lives. And with cloud services, the source for data and applications used by these devices can be anywhere, too. The flexibility of cloud to scale bandwidth up or down at will, and its affordability as a pay-as-you-go service, have resulted in an interconnected, intelligent approach to smarter computing. [Read more…]

Share